SUPERELONGATION DISEASE OF CASSAVA CAUSED BY Elsinoe brasiliensis

Publication Date
Wed, 27 Mar 2013, 01:00
Last Updated
Aug. 28, 2020, 7:18 a.m.
Report Number
TTO-08/3
Country
Trinidad and Tobago
Pest Id
Elsinoe brasiliensis - (SPHAMA)
Report Status
Preliminary
Hosts
Cassava (Manihot esculenta)
Pest Status
  • Present: in all parts of the area
Geographical Distribution
The disease was found in all counties of Trinidad and was more severe in central and southern areas.
Summary

Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is the second staple crop of economic importance after rice that is cultivated in Trinidad and Tobago. Superelongation disease (SED) was first reported to occur in Trinidad in 2008. The symptoms of this disease include raised, reddish brown to tan-coloured corky leisons on the petioles and mid-ribs of leaves and stems as well as chlorotic spots with necrotic centres on leaves. Leisions on the veins and mid-ribs are lens-shaped and appear on the lower surface of the leaves. Leaves appear noticeably twisted and partially curled upwards during the rainy season. Elongation of the internodes is reported in the literature for this disease, were not observed in Trinidad. However, during the surveys conducted, symptoms of mild elongation of the internodes have been observed on a few cassava fields in Trinidad. Superelongation disease of cassava is caused by the fungus Elsinoe brasiliensis. It is a splashborne disease and can be spread by infected planting material.

Danger
Reduced yield in crop
Contact for info
IPPC Contact Point , Trinidad and Tobago
Report files
En
Issue keywords
Pest reporting Pest status:Absent/Absence
Commodity keywords
Roots and tubers of manioc, arrowroot, salep, Jerusalem artichokes, sweet potatoes and similar roots and tubers with high starch or inulin content, fresh, chilled, frozen or dried, whether or not sliced or in the form of pellets; sago pith

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